Going Global

Nancy Berg, in Remembering Baghdad

Chair of the Department of Jewish, Islamic, and Near Eastern Languages and Cultures at Washington University in St. Louis, Berg has also taught courses in Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies and in International and Area Studies. Her research focuses on the Israeli mystery, women writers, food in literature, place, memory, and the choice of language. 

 

 

Peter Benson, in An Adult Choice?: Corporate Responsibility and the Global Face of Tobacco

Benson is an associate professor of anthropology at Washington University in St. Louis. His research looks at the role that big industries and corporations play in shaping culture and society, with a specific focus on tobacco in the United States. He is also concerned with the rise of “corporate social responsibility” campaigns in harmful or hazardous industries and the ways that businesses address and influence ethical issues.

 

John Bowen, in Islam, Immigration, and What It Means to Be French

John Bowen is the Dunbar-Van Cleve Professor in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis.  His current research focuses on comparative social studies of Islam across the world and how Muslims sort out and make sense of plural sources of norms and values, including diverse interpretations of the Islamic tradition, law codes and decisions, and local social norms.

 

 


Geoff Childs, in Migration and Change in the Himalayan Highlands

Having worked with four distinct Tibetan societies, Childs focuses on both demography and ethnography is his research in order to understand what is happening within a population and what drives those trends. He is an associate professor of anthropology at Washington University in St. Louis.

 


Matthew Gabel, in When Countries Cheat

A John Simon Guggenheim Fellow from 2010-2011, Gabel has long-standing interest in public opinion and how elites shape mass attitudes. His research interests include comparative politics, legislative, judicial, mass behavior, European politics, and health policy. He is a professor and the associate chair for the Department of Political Science at Washington University in St. Louis.

 

 

Bret Gustafson, in Natural Gas in the New Bolivia

Working with Indigenous movements in Bolivia and Guatemala, Gustafson studies the conjoined politics of language, race, and decolonization. Specifically, he focuses on Indigenous language and education issues in Bolivia and across Latin America, which has led him to join an ongoing collaborative project on school reform in St. Louis. Gustafson is an associate professor of anthropology at Washington University in St. Louis.

 

Glenn Davis Stone, in India and Biotechnology

President of the Anthropology and Environment Society from 2011-2013, Stone is currently researching the spread of genetically modified crops in developing countries and its influence on indigenous knowledge and technology change among rice and cotton farmers in India and the Philippines. Among others, his interests include social and political aspects of agricultural systems, agricultural sustainability, and the intensification and industrialization of food and farmiing systems. He is a professor of anthropology and environmental studies at Washington University in St. Louis.

 

Margit Tavits, in In a Global Economy, What Happens to Elections?

Tavits is a professor and director of graduate studies for the Department of Political Science at Washington University in St. Louis. Having conducted fieldwork throughout Eastern Europe, she currently has a particular interest in the competition between political parties and how that competition informs their strategies. 


 

Lewis Wall, in A Few Dollars Can Help Girls Stay in School. Here's How.

With over thirty years of clinical experience as a practicing obstetrician-gynecologist, Wall has been actively involved in a variety of clinical projects in order to counteract reproductive health problems in developing countries. Currently, he is involved with the The Menstrual Dignity Project to improve the lives of adolescent schoolgirls in Ethiopia. He is the Selina Okin Kim Conner Professor in Arts and Sciences for Medical Anthropology at Washington University in St. Louis.

 


Dalson Ward, in In a Global Economy, What Happens to Elections?

Ward is a a PhD student in the Department of Political Science at Washington University in St. Louis. He is interested in the role the political views of local politicians and parties play in immigrants' political and economic integration, as well as the effects of diversity among immigrants. More broadly, his research is concerned with party competition, representation, and how institutions enhance or limit accountability.

 

 

 


Carol Camp Yeakey, in The Human Problem Facing Global Cities

Yeakey is the Founding Director of the Washington University Center on Urban Research and Policy and the Founding Director of the Interdisciplinary Program in Urban Studies at Washington University in St. Louis.  She also holds faculty appointments in Education, International & Area Studies, American Culture Studies, and Urban Studies. Her primary area of research is social welfare policy as said policy pertains to marginalized children, young adults and families and the neighborhood contexts in which they live.