Retellings

Retellings was a part of Hold that Thought's second season, recorded in Summer 2013.

 

Mary Jo Bang, in Translating Dante
Bang is a professor of English at Washington University. She is the author of six books of poems, including Elegy (2007) which received the National Book Critics Circle Award. She has received a "Discovery"/The Nation award, a Pushcart Prize, and a grant from the Guggenheim Foundation. Her translation of Dante's Inferno (2012) was named a Notable Book by the Academy of American Poets and the American Library Association.

 

 

Kathryn Davis, in The Ghost in the Machine
Davis is the Hurst Writer in Residence at Washington University. She is the author of six novels, the most recent of which is Duplex (2013). Her other books include Hell: A Novel (1998), The Walking Tour (1999), Versailles (2002), and The Thin Place (2006). She has received a Kafka Prize for fiction by an American woman, the Morton Dauwen Zabel Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and a Guggenheim Fellowship.

 

 

Anton DiSclafani, in Coming of Age
DiSclafani is a Writer in Residence at Washington University in St. Louis. Her acclaimed debut novel, The Yonahlossee Riding Camp for Girls was released by Riverhead Books in 2013. She graduated from Emory University and completed her MFA at Washington University.

 

 

 

Danielle Dutton, in A Room of One's Own
Dutton is an assistant professor of English at Washington University. She is the author of Attempts at a Life and SPRAWL, which was shortlisted for the Believer Book Award. Before joining the faculty at Washington University, she taught in the Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics at Naropa and was the book designer at Dalkey Archive Press. Dutton founded and edits the small press Dorothy, a publishing project.

 

 

Kelly Link, in Magical Realism
Link was a visiting Hurst professor at Washington University in St. Louis in Spring 2013. She is the author of three collections of short stories, Stranger Things Happen, Magic for Beginners, and Pretty Monsters. Her short stories have won three Nebulas, a Hugo, and a World Fantasy Award. Link and her husband, Gavin J. Grant, run Small Beer Press, and play ping-pong. In 1996 they started the occasional zine Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet.

 

 

William McKelvy, in Magical Realism
McKelvy is an associate professor of English at Washington University in St. Louis. His reserach focuses on 19th century British literature and culture, and he has published work on Alfred Tennyson, George Eliot, Thomas Babington Macaulay, John Keble, and the Victorian statesman William Ewart Gladstone. Areas of related interest include the Kunstler-roman, historiography, book history, the history of education, and late eighteenth-century theological controversies.

 

 

Edward McPherson, in Slippery Nonfiction
McPherson is an assistant professor of English at Washington University in St. Louis. He is the author of two nonfiction books: Buster Keaton: Tempest in a Flat Hat and The Backwash Squeeze and Other Improbable Feats. He has written for the New York Times Magazine, Salon, the Paris Review, Tin House, The Gettysburg Review, and Talk, among others. He received his MFA from the University of Minnesota, where he received the Gesell Award in Fiction.

 

 

Timothy Moore, in A Life in Verse
Moore is the John and Penelope Biggs Distinguished Professor of Classics at Washington University in St. Louis. His work concentrates on areas of classical antiquity, including the comic theatre of Greece and Rome, Greek and Roman music, and Roman historiography. Current projects include articles on music in two plays of the Roman comic playwright Terence and a project on the influence on the modern world of the Roman historian Livy.

 

 

Carl Phillips, in A Life in Verse
Phillips is a professor of English at Washington University. A finalist for both the National Book Award and the National Book Critics Circle Award, he is the author of twelve books of poetry, including Silverchest (2013) and Double Shadow (2011), which won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize. In addition to contemporary poetry and the writing of it, his academic interests include classical philology, translation, and the history of prosody in English.

 

 

Jessica Rosenfeld, in Translating Dante
Rosenfeld is an associate professor of English at Washington University. Her research interests traverse English and continental medieval literature as well as medieval and modern moral philosophy and literary theory. Her book, Ethics and Enjoyment in Late Medieval PoetryLove after Aristotle, explores the influence of Aristotelian ethics on the way medieval philosophers and poets wrote about love, pleasure, labor, and human happiness.

 

 

Vincent Sherry, in A Room of One's Own
Sherry is the Howard Neverov Professor in the Humanities and a professor of English at Washington University. He teaches and writes about literary modernism in Britain and Ireland. His current projects include Dying Generation: Modernism, Decadence, and the Inspiration of Last Days. This book traces the relation between “high” modernism and the “decadence” of the writers and painters of the later Victorian Age.